Digging for answers to gardening

Digging for answers to gardening

Postby healthydecode » Tue Nov 18, 2014 7:31 pm

Members of the Burlington County Master Gardeners program interested in soil conservation took note.
Dug out of a field at the Burlington County Community Agricultural Center in Moorestown, the dirt was the main attraction during a workshop presented by agricultural agents with Rutgers Cooperative Extension.
The lesson unearthed answers about soil horizons (or layers) and what information can be harvested from them. It was one of the educational opportunities designed for the Master Gardeners.
Brian McDonald, the Master Gardener Coordinator, said the organization plays a big role for the community’s horticulture enthusiasts. It’s run by Rutgers Cooperative Extension and financed by the county.
“We get a lot of support from both,” said McDonald.
Relying on volunteer labor, it assists the public with their gardening issues through the Helpline, available daily at 9 a.m. until noon or 1 p.m., depending on the season. Members of the public are welcome to call the Helpline (609-265-5050), send an email (mgburlingtoncounty@gmail.com), or visit the Westampton office (2 Academy Drive) to have gardening questions addressed.
Typical inquiry topics address growing issues, plant identification, lawn maintenance, insects, landscaping, preparing a garden for winter and composting.
“Tree and shrub questions were the most popular last year, double anything else,” said McDonald, a Palmyra resident.
In addition to manning the “call center,” volunteers attend the Burlington County Farmers Market at the agricultural center, where they answer questions and give out information. Group members, who have specific fields of interest, also make occasional presentations to the public.
Volunteer Susan Gennett of Burlington Township enjoys talking to the public about children and produce. She said kids enjoy picking their own fruits and vegetables. They’re also more likely to eat them when they’ve participated in the growing and harvest cycle.
“Your helping people learn to take care of themselves,” said Gennett.
Mount Laurel resident Bill Beetle began volunteering with the Master Gardeners following a career in urban planning. An officer of the Native Plant Society, his interests lie in public spaces, combining his love of gardening with his professional expertise.
Merry Bogert, a retiree from Mooretown, specializes in using native plants to attract wildlife, including birds, “critters” and pollenators, and support them with native plants. Butterfly gardens are an example of what people can do at home, said the volunteer.
McDonald, a Moorestown native who earned degrees in forestry at West Virginia University, was hired by the county in August. He has since been working to provide more hands-on classes for the public and better utilizing volunteers. Rather than having presenters from outside the group operate many of its programs, he said he’s trying to do more “in-house.”
The Master Gardeners program and its members mutually benefit from classes that educate volunteers about the many areas of horticulture. Typically, a presentation, such as the recent soil conservation workshop, is made by an agricultural agent or other specialist and is followed by field work.
“I love it,” said Bogert. “You never stop learning.”
Each year, new members of the Master Gardeners sign up and are required to go through 60 hours of extensive horticulture training and pass an examination before they can participate with the Helpline and other activities with the organization.
McDonald said the goal is to provide them with as much information as possible.
“It’s like a three-and-a-half month course on everything,” he said.
A new course cycle is scheduled to begin in January. Classes are held during the daytime, typically twice a week for about 10 weeks into April. Testing takes place at the end of the cycle.
“We’re looking for interested applicants,” McDonald said. For more information about joining the program here.
healthydecode
 
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Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:04 pm

How to find some new

Postby NikodiNen » Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:03 am

Members of the Burlington County Master Gardeners program interested in soil conservation took note.Dug out of a field at the Burlington County Community Agricultural Center in Moorestown, the dirt was the main attraction during a workshop presented by agricultural agents with Rutgers Cooperative Extension.The lesson unearthed answers about soil horizons (or layers) and what information can be harvested from them. It was one of the educational opportunities designed for the Master Gardeners.Brian McDonald, the Master Gardener Coordinator, said the organization plays a big role for the community’s horticulture enthusiasts. It’s run by Rutgers Cooperative Extension and financed by the county.“We get a lot of support from both,” said McDonald.Relying on volunteer labor, it assists the public with their gardening issues through the Helpline, available daily at 9 a.m. until noon or 1 p.m., depending on the season. Members of the public are welcome to call the Helpline (609-265-5050), send an email (mgburlingtoncounty@gmail.com), or visit the Westampton office (2 Academy Drive) to have gardening questions addressed.Typical inquiry topics address growing issues, plant identification, lawn maintenance, insects, landscaping, preparing a garden for winter and composting.“Tree and shrub questions were the most popular last year, double anything else,” said McDonald, a Palmyra resident.In addition to manning the “call center,” volunteers attend the Burlington County Farmers Market at the agricultural center, where they answer questions and give out information. Group members, who have specific fields of interest, also make occasional presentations to the public.Volunteer Susan Gennett of Burlington Township enjoys talking to the public about children and produce. She said kids enjoy picking their own fruits and vegetables. They’re also more likely to eat them when they’ve participated in the growing and harvest cycle.“Your helping people learn to take care of themselves,” said Gennett.Mount Laurel resident Bill Beetle began volunteering with the Master Gardeners following a career in urban planning. An officer of the Native Plant Society, his interests lie in public spaces, combining his love of gardening with his professional expertise.Merry Bogert, a retiree from Mooretown, specializes in using native plants to attract wildlife, including birds, “critters” and pollenators, and support them with native plants. Butterfly gardens are an example of what people can do at home, said the volunteer.McDonald, a Moorestown native who earned degrees in forestry at West Virginia University, was hired by the county in August. He has since been working to provide more hands-on classes for the public and better utilizing volunteers. Rather than having presenters from outside the group operate many of its programs, he said he’s trying to do more “in-house.”The Master Gardeners program and its members mutually benefit from classes that educate volunteers about the many areas of horticulture. Typically, a presentation, such as the recent soil conservation workshop, is made by an agricultural agent or other specialist and is followed by field work.“I love it,” said Bogert. “You never stop learning.”Each year, new members of the Master Gardeners sign up and are required to go through 60 hours of extensive horticulture training and pass an examination before they can participate with the Helpline and other activities with the organization.McDonald said the goal is to provide them with as much information as possible.“It’s like a three-and-a-half month course on everything,” he said.A new course cycle is scheduled to begin in January. Classes are held during the daytime, typically twice a week for about 10 weeks into April. Testing takes place at the end of the cycle.“We’re looking for interested applicants,” McDonald said. For more information about joining the program here.
In it something is. Thanks for the help in this question.
NikodiNen
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2016 11:41 am
Location: Netherlands Antilles

How to find some new

Postby NikodiNen » Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:04 am

Members of the Burlington County Master Gardeners program interested in soil conservation took note.Dug out of a field at the Burlington County Community Agricultural Center in Moorestown, the dirt was the main attraction during a workshop presented by agricultural agents with Rutgers Cooperative Extension.The lesson unearthed answers about soil horizons (or layers) and what information can be harvested from them. It was one of the educational opportunities designed for the Master Gardeners.Brian McDonald, the Master Gardener Coordinator, said the organization plays a big role for the community’s horticulture enthusiasts. It’s run by Rutgers Cooperative Extension and financed by the county.“We get a lot of support from both,” said McDonald.Relying on volunteer labor, it assists the public with their gardening issues through the Helpline, available daily at 9 a.m. until noon or 1 p.m., depending on the season. Members of the public are welcome to call the Helpline (609-265-5050), send an email (mgburlingtoncounty@gmail.com), or visit the Westampton office (2 Academy Drive) to have gardening questions addressed.Typical inquiry topics address growing issues, plant identification, lawn maintenance, insects, landscaping, preparing a garden for winter and composting.“Tree and shrub questions were the most popular last year, double anything else,” said McDonald, a Palmyra resident.In addition to manning the “call center,” volunteers attend the Burlington County Farmers Market at the agricultural center, where they answer questions and give out information. Group members, who have specific fields of interest, also make occasional presentations to the public.Volunteer Susan Gennett of Burlington Township enjoys talking to the public about children and produce. She said kids enjoy picking their own fruits and vegetables. They’re also more likely to eat them when they’ve participated in the growing and harvest cycle.“Your helping people learn to take care of themselves,” said Gennett.Mount Laurel resident Bill Beetle began volunteering with the Master Gardeners following a career in urban planning. An officer of the Native Plant Society, his interests lie in public spaces, combining his love of gardening with his professional expertise.Merry Bogert, a retiree from Mooretown, specializes in using native plants to attract wildlife, including birds, “critters” and pollenators, and support them with native plants. Butterfly gardens are an example of what people can do at home, said the volunteer.McDonald, a Moorestown native who earned degrees in forestry at West Virginia University, was hired by the county in August. He has since been working to provide more hands-on classes for the public and better utilizing volunteers. Rather than having presenters from outside the group operate many of its programs, he said he’s trying to do more “in-house.”The Master Gardeners program and its members mutually benefit from classes that educate volunteers about the many areas of horticulture. Typically, a presentation, such as the recent soil conservation workshop, is made by an agricultural agent or other specialist and is followed by field work.“I love it,” said Bogert. “You never stop learning.”Each year, new members of the Master Gardeners sign up and are required to go through 60 hours of extensive horticulture training and pass an examination before they can participate with the Helpline and other activities with the organization.McDonald said the goal is to provide them with as much information as possible.“It’s like a three-and-a-half month course on everything,” he said.A new course cycle is scheduled to begin in January. Classes are held during the daytime, typically twice a week for about 10 weeks into April. Testing takes place at the end of the cycle.“We’re looking for interested applicants,” McDonald said. For more information about joining the program here.
I do not understand
NikodiNen
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2016 11:41 am
Location: Netherlands Antilles

How to find some new

Postby NikodiNen » Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:06 am

The most common insulation materials used in homes are fiberglass batts and blown in cellulose. Fiberglass batts consist of extremely fine glass fibersis. It is less expensive but difficult to install them correctly. If to install fiberglass properly it should be no gap, void or compressions. Blown in celllulose is made from recycled newspaper. It costs more but it is easier to dense pack the existing walls and attics, especially hard to reach areas. High-density batts for an 12-inch spaces offer about an R-38 value. To acheive R-38 blown in cellulose needed to be 11 inches.Other insulation materials such as foam, sheep's wool, cotton... are even more expensive.
Between us speaking, try to look for the answer to your question in google.com
NikodiNen
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2016 11:41 am
Location: Netherlands Antilles

How to find some new

Postby NikodiNen » Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:07 am

I would follow the manufacturer's instructions and clean it once a year. If I live in a really dusty area I might clean it more often, but still not every day.
Very curious question
NikodiNen
 
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